8 American homemade pop music videos by 10cc

10cc- I’m Not in love (1975) – American homemade montage breakup video

short version is better without Kathy Redfern’s midsection

Too bad that the song on a 7″ 45 RPM single had Kathy Redfern’s annoying be-quiet-big-boys-don’t-cry junk ruining in midsong that 10cc’s record label, Mercury had no time to omit, plus it’s too bad that the repeated first verse was omitted too abruptly. I will call that song very heartfelt and bittersweet that touches my heart, because it’s mainly all about marriage relationship falling out of favor. Besides it’s very touching. 

I made a comment about that song on YouTube and said: 

It’s too bad that in 1975 British band 10cc might have taken a break from having a wacky sense of humor and started concentrating on a serious relevant version of the bittersweet heartbreaking ballad, “I’m Not In Love”, minus Kathy Redfern’s self-parody and believe me it is 10 times better than the epic 6-minute version of that song with her part added.

10cc – I’m Not in Love – Knebworth Version – with end song credits

Art for Art’s Sake-10cc – Aerobic Dancing Version

Biting the hand that feeds them? Or hoisted upon their own hubris? Either way, Eric Stewart/Graham Gouldman’s supremely hard rock-inflected examination of their own musical motives ranks among 10cc’s most transparent offerings, at the same time rating among their most popular releases ever.

As a (harshly edited) single previewing the forthcoming How Dare You album, it reached a mere number 83 in the U.S. in late 1975. But it was Top Five in Britain, and live, its jam-for-jam’s sake construction allowed the band to stretch out to impossible lengths — the eight-minute version included on 1977’s Live and Let Live isn’t even the longest version they ever performed.

10cc- I’m Mandy Fly Me – The Woman Hunter Version w/ Barbara Eden, Stuart Whitman & Robert Vaughn – with end song credits

much better Americanized music video to watch

A follow-up of sorts to “Clockwork Creep” (from the Sheet Music album), “I’m Mandy, Fly Me” is a superbly detailed and supremely dippy romance set around — what else? — a plane crash. Composed by Eric Stewart (who takes the lead vocal), Graham Gouldman, and Lol Crème, and built around spiraling multi-tracked acoustic guitars, smooth harmonies, and a classically dreamy pop melody, “I’m Mandy” even begins with a snatch of that earlier song, before zeroing in on the glamorous “I’m (insert pretty stewardess’ name here), Fly Me” billboards which were a staple of ’70s airline advertising. Mandy seats the singer, feeds him, caters to his every need, and, when the jetliner crashes into the shark-infested ocean, she pulls him to safety. It’s only once he’s rescued that he discovers he was the only survivor.

The second single from the group’s 1976 How Dare You album (the last to feature all four original members), “I’m Mandy” reached number six in the U.K. and number 60 in America. It remained in the band’s live set for the remainder of their career — a fine version is included on 1977’s Live and Let Live concert LP.

10cc – The Things We Do for Love (1977) – Shane & Kimberly Version

The first single to be drawn from the bisected 10cc’s post-split debut, 1977’s Deceptive Bends, “Things We Do for Love” was also the template for most of the group’s future work. As a quartet, Eric Stewart and Graham Gouldman’s rocking romantic sensibilities had been intriguingly warped and twisted by Godley/Crème’s off-kilter art school ambitions and, of course, vice versa. Deceptive Bends, like the other pairs’ Consequences, served predictable notice that the parts were never going to be equal to the sum. But the unrepentantly soppy “Things We Do for Love” at least let us know who had the tightest hold on the public’s affections.

Lush Beach Boys-meet-“I’m Not in Love”-shaped harmonies, a chorus which could have stepped out of any ’60s-era Graham Gouldman masterpiece, a Stewart guitar solo so smooth he could have creamed his coffee with it, “Things We Do for Love” reached number five in America, number six in Britain, and set this half of 10cc on course for a period of almost unprecedented success.

10cc – The Things We Do For Love – Scripture Version

“The Things We Do for Love” is a song by British band 10cc, released as a single in 1976. It later featured on the album Deceptive Bends released in 1977 and was the group’s first release after the departure of band members Godley and Creme. The song was a hit in various countries worldwide, reaching number one in Canada,[2] as well as peaking at number 6 in the UK,[3] number 5 in the US[4] and Australia, number 13 in the Netherlands,[5] and number 2 in Ireland.[6]

10cc – For You and I – Frankie Crocker Version

For You and I is a 10cc single . It comes from their album Bloody Tourists .

The song is about the people who are good always comment on people who have bad and especially in the big context (The world is full of other people, we’re quick to laugh when they’ve got troubles) . One would have to look around a bit more and take account of each other to make this world exist for everyone.

The single with on the b-side I’m Not in Love almost never reached the hit parade.

Musicians:
Eric Stewart – vocals, electric piano , moog , polymoog
Graham Gouldman – six string bass guitar , acoustic and electric guitar, backing vocals
Rick Fenn – moog, electric guitar, background vocals
Stuart Tosh – background vocals
Paul Burgess – percussion , big drum

10cc -For You and I -Scripture version – w/ clips from Edge of Night

For You and I is a 10cc single . It comes from their album Bloody Tourists .

The song is about the people who are good always comment on people who have bad and especially in the big context (The world is full of other people, we’re quick to laugh when they’ve got troubles) . One would have to look around a bit more and take account of each other to make this world exist for everyone.

The single with on the b-side I’m Not in Love almost never reached the hit parade.

Musicians:
Eric Stewart – vocals, electric piano , moog , polymoog
Graham Gouldman – six string bass guitar , acoustic and electric guitar, backing vocals
Rick Fenn – moog, electric guitar, background vocals
Stuart Tosh – background vocals
Paul Burgess – percussion , big drum

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